Curry Carrot Turkey Burgers


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Turkey’s the quintessential healthy choice when it comes to making burgers for summer backyard barbecues — a lighter, leaner option over ground beef. But all too often those burgers (with so much potential!) fall flat in the flavor department. And they’re likely dry as a hockey puck too.

So what do you do?

Follow these four simple tips and you’ll be enjoying deliciously flavorful, tender turkey burgers in no time.

Make fat your friend.

When choosing ground turkey, always opt for 94% lean which is a blend of both breast and thigh meat. The higher fat content and inclusion of dark thigh meat means you’ll have a juicier, more complex burger from the get go. You’ll also want to opt for organic turkey (or at least antibiotic-free).

Season well.

Spices are key when it comes to a good turkey burger — but even adding enough salt + pepper does wonders. My personal trick is mixing in a dollop of Dijon mustard and a sprinkle of paprika for that little extra something.

You can find both my basic turkey burger recipe and a veggie-packed curry carrot version here. Adding veggies and fresh herbs boosts nutrition, adds flavor, and keeps the burgers moist.

Don’t over mix.

Over-handling the meat yields a compact, tough burger so you’ll want to mix as little as possible. I like to premix my spices and add-ins before adding the turkey meat. Then, I’ll wet or oil my hands to prevent sticking and gently form the burger patties — being careful to not compress the meat.

Cook them just enough.

It’s a fine line between a fully-cooked turkey burger and an over-cooked turkey burger. Be sure to keep an eye on the cook time and pull the burgers as soon as the juices run clear and a meat thermometer reads 165 degrees Fahrenheit when inserted into the center. Unlike ground beef, turkey should not be pink in the center.

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Get the recipe HERE.

And if you’re looking for something a little simpler, you can follow this same recipe but just add a tablespoon of Dijon mustard, salt, and pepper to the meat for a basic burger.